Updated June 14, 2013
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Folks, please don't discount the great companionship that our Senior Boy, Kilo has to offer!  Senior routines are simple, their care is minimal but the joys of having them in your lives are endless!

Check out his story on our
Available Dogs Page

KILO

KILO
THE JOYS OF ADOPTING A SENIOR DOG

At what age is a dog considered to be a senior?  It definitely depends on the breed and size of the dog but the concensus is that age seven denotes senior status.  The life expectancy for dogs today has greatly increased and thanks to excellent veterinary care, quality diets and lots of love, these dogs don't just live longer, they thrive in their Golden Years.  Would you consider adopting an older dog?  You may be surprised to see just how well a senior dog would fit your lifestyle.

While there are many obvious reasons to adopt a senior dog, the most important one is probably the instant friend you will have.  Senior dogs have "been there, done that" and generally settle right in.  They are mature- they know right from wrong and since they are not teething, chewing is not a concern.  Even better, they are house trained.  No potty training required with these older, wiser Boxers. 

It seems that the puppies get a lot of attention on our site and it's understandable, they are adorable. However, pups require a great deal of time and patience and do require someone to be home with them the majority of the day.  These are difficult requirements for most of us to fulfill.  Puppies are definitely not for everyone.  Even young dogs, considered adolescents until age two, can be a handful.  With a senior dog, you are able to carry on as usual, as they are able to give you peace of mind.  They don't need the level of supervision that younger dogs do and are often content to find a comfortable spot and nap the afternoon away.

Take a moment and consider your life with a senior dog.  Think about the instant best friend you will get and the ease of transitioning a mature dog into your home.  Most importantly, think about the impact you can have on the dog's life by giving them a second chance in a loving, safe home.  I promise, they will be forever grateful.

~ Patricia O'Brien Roche ~
NLBR Applications & Placement Coordinator
willy-c@verizon.net
ivey9297@roadrunner.com
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